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Just wondering how I should have my stock suspension tuned on my 2022 Commander? It is currently at the softest setting. I love the comfort of the ride on the trails but I only go a couple times a year and most of my riding is on asphalt and gravel. Should I leave it where it’s at or tune it to a firmer setting when I’m not trail’ing it?
 

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Assuming you have a regular XT there is no real "tuning" to do. You are just setting preload of the springs which raises it a little higher but it does not change the spring rates or really affect ride other than keeping it from bottoming out. So if you do bottom out, then one step at a time increase the static ride height till it stops. You will probably also need to raise it as the OEM springs start to sag. How much weight you carry should also affect the adjustment you chose.
 

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Assuming you have a regular XT there is no real "tuning" to do. You are just setting preload of the springs which raises it a little higher but it does not change the spring rates or really affect ride other than keeping it from bottoming out. So if you do bottom out, then one step at a time increase the static ride height till it stops. You will probably also need to raise it as the OEM springs start to sag. How much weight you carry should also affect the adjustment you chose.
Any time you add preload to a spring it not only raises the vehicle it also increases the spring rate. With height comes stiffer ride do to increased spring rate .

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Don't want to get hung up on semantics.... but unless you add to or take away steel from a spring or change coil spacing you are not changing the "spring rate". ( the rate can change with fatigue from use and age, but it's less) You can preload a spring and thereby start the loading at a further point in the springs compression loading. If it's a 100# spring rate then it takes a 100# to compress an inch, but if you squeeze the spring 1" in a static position, now you have to add 200# to compress it an inch. The practical result, is the spring is initially stiffer, but you did not change the "spring rate". As noted I made an assumption that the shocks were the typically cheap ones with the three step ramps, not the Fox with an opportunity to change the springs and use different rates or double springs with crossovers. (Not to mention valving.) I actually used some heavier 'spring rate' springs over OEM on my former car, but got a smoother softer ride cause of not having to preload the springs for the ride height needed. The suspension travel was able to preform in the less compression end of the range. That is what I would reference as 'tuning'.
 

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That's the purpose of adding preload. You are right at 1" its 200#. But if preload is 2" it's now at 400#. So increasing preload is increasing the preloaded spring rate. If it doesn't change the machine doesn't raise and the ride wouldn't stiffen up. Puck lifts prefect example. Add a spacer ring you gain lift but the ride gets horribly harsh/stiff. But they are great for the mud guys that need lift for big tires but don't trail ride.

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