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Ody...I checked the schematic briefly and did find 2 diodes in the winch circuit ....D4&D5......looks like a possibility since the winch has 12volts 24/7 ....try pulling the 6 GA & 16 GA wires from ground and check for drain if all else fails

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
It appears to be my stereo causing the drain. It draws 57 MA with power off for its memory. Thats actually a lot more than i expected to see. 5.7 MA would be more in the range I would expect. I disconnected its ground and the battery has been stable for a week at 12.88 VDC
 

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I'm having a similar issue, but I dont have a stereo or anything aftermarket installed. I recently installed a new battery as I found the previous one drained a couple times and would drain over the course of a week. New battery is charged and while running shows 14.2-14.2v, and is draining .5v over night. Last night I disconnected the winch, and I still have some drain, about .2v over 10 hours.

I've read of the process where you disconnect the negative battery terminal and use a test light and pull fuses, I'm just not sure I understand it completely. Can this also be done with a multimeter and what would I be looking for when I pull the fuses? I was hoping to find a how-to on youtube but my searches aren't bringing the results I'm looking for. If anyone has any tips, or links please let me know, thanks!
 

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A digital multimeter with a current range will work.
Plug the meter leads into the current measurement positions on the meter. Set the meter to the highest current range available. (Most meters have a 10Amp range which should more than enough). Disconnect the negative lead from the battery. Connect the black lead (-) from the meter to the negative battery terminal. Connect the red (+) lead from the meter to the negative battery cable.
You should now see any parasitic current flow. If the reading on the meter is very low you can select a lower current range on the meter if available to get more resolution, just don't select a range less than what you are reading on the meter, or you will blow the fuse in the meter.
Start pulling fuses until the meter current reading drops.
I don't know what the normal parasitic current draw is, but there will be some small (less than 1 amp draw) to keep the clock and some other electronics running.
The drop you are seeing is high, but over time the battery will drain due to the normal current draw. I keep a maintenance charger on mine when not in use to keep the battery charged.
 

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A digital multimeter with a current range will work.
Plug the meter leads into the current measurement positions on the meter. Set the meter to the highest current range available. (Most meters have a 10Amp range which should more than enough). Disconnect the negative lead from the battery. Connect the black lead (-) from the meter to the negative battery terminal. Connect the red (+) lead from the meter to the negative battery cable.
You should now see any parasitic current flow. If the reading on the meter is very low you can select a lower current range on the meter if available to get more resolution, just don't select a range less than what you are reading on the meter, or you will blow the fuse in the meter.
Start pulling fuses until the meter current reading drops.
I don't know what the normal parasitic current draw is, but there will be some small (less than 1 amp draw) to keep the clock and some other electronics running.
The drop you are seeing is high, but over time the battery will drain due to the normal current draw. I keep a maintenance charger on mine when not in use to keep the battery charged.
Thank you sir! Exactly what I've been searching for, the meter I have does have those settings (fluke 87) will do a 5-20amp range.
 

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Just an update on what I’m finding, I followed the procedure above and unhooked the negative battery terminal, and put my meter on the negative battery post and the negative battery wire, and I’m finding 36mA and have pulled every fuse and got the same results. Last night I took the winch out of the vehicle to eliminate that, but didn’t check the parasitic draw before that. Does 36mA sound reasonable? I don’t have any accessories installed.
 

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36 milliamps doesn't sound unreasonable, but......I decided to check mine for reference. I have a '12xt with factory winch. My only aftermarket electrical accessory is rear halogen lights, operated by a dash switch, and powered from the 12v accessory plug circuit. My fuel pump is disconnected, as the tank is out for water pump seal replacement. I charged my battery first. I'm reading 0 current draw in series with the negative battery cable. I'm using a Fluke 73, and I also tried a 12v test light. It did not light.
 

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The voltage regulator is always connected, also. If you can't find the drain, you might unplug it and test. If the draw stops, you may have a shorted diode in the rectumfrier. If you have an aftermarket regulator, I'd do that test first.
 
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