Can-Am Commander Forum banner
41 - 60 of 62 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Regular gas in oklahoma has i believe around 85 but i know ive seen some 84 and maybe some 83 before aswell and premium ive seen 93 for sure and im certain ive seen 95 also and some 94 but unleaded plus in inbetween there is usually around 86 to 87 or 88 but is NOT sapose to have ethonal in it but i could be completely wrong about this i gotta get diesel in the mornin anyways i'll check and let yall know tomarrow

and no i have not done anything to upgrade my cooling system and in your opinion do you think the motor would be fine with unleaded plus?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
WOW I was WAY off!!! Regular is 86 some 85 and Unleaded Plus (medium) is 88 and some 89 and premium is 92 and 93.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,764 Posts
Regular gas in oklahoma has i believe around 85 but i know ive seen some 84 and maybe some 83 before aswell and premium ive seen 93 for sure and im certain ive seen 95 also and some 94 but unleaded plus in inbetween there is usually around 86 to 87 or 88 but is NOT sapose to have ethonal in it but i could be completely wrong about this i gotta get diesel in the mornin anyways i'll check and let yall know tomarrow

and no i have not done anything to upgrade my cooling system and in your opinion do you think the motor would be fine with unleaded plus?
I would use the octane recommended in your manual, which is probably 87.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
For now on that's what I'm using, before I had no idea they called for a certain octane level gasoline to be used in the motor. But thanks for all the info!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,008 Posts
My commander and rock buggy both run crappy with premium My buddy hit the 93 button to fill them both up and I figured ah what the heck fill em up. I learned that trip that it was no good but only now I know why. Thats the only time 93 has ever been in either vehicle, wont happen again. Will PC5 advance timing enough to make use of it?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,764 Posts
For now on that's what I'm using, before I had no idea they called for a certain octane level gasoline to be used in the motor. But thanks for all the info!!
This goes for all of your vehicles to include your daily driver. 99% percent of the American public has been duped in thinking running higher octane is a cleaner and better fuel. Don't need to give the oil companies any more money unless your vehicle calls for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
I run Premium in mine because my Motorcycle requires Premium and it's to much of a pain to keep with what is in what gas can at the house. So I just put Premium in all the cans and it does matter what I am putting it in what machine. Motorcycle, Commander, or either of my 4 Wheelers. Yes the cost is a bit more but its worth not having to worry about what is what can. If I am stopping and fueling up on the way to the woods the Commander gets regular unleaded 87 octane just like my truck. If I know that I won't be driving/riding any of my toys for a while. I put a Ring Saver or some other Ethanol killing additive in the machine to try and avoid the problems it causes when machines sit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
All gas from regular 87 to premium 93 has enthanol in it. Most states are required to post this on the pumps. Here in Alabama they are posted on all the pumps stating may contain up to 10% enthanol. Now there are some stations that have enthanol free gas and they usually advertise with no enthanol gas and they do not have the stickers at the pump stating anything about enthonel. Not having enthanol is better especially for these smaller engines I beleive but the gas with enthanol won't hurt anything
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,066 Posts
Reminds me back when I was alot younger and I had a buddy that always insisted on running 93 in his motorcycle and I had the same motorcycle has him except I used 87. My buddies cycle would start and run fine but when he shut it down after riding a while he couldn't ever get it started until the engine had cooled way down. I always laughed at him and told him the 93 was messing up things (my dad was a engine mechanic) I finally got him to fill up with 87 and what do you know his bike ran like mine, perfect. We gave him hell about his nonsence for years after that. LOL!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
The problem with 10% enthanol fuel is it go's BAD much quicker tham non-ethanol fuel. I've had lots of problems with lawn mowers since this entanol thing started. The local Honda shop buys carbs for the new mowers a dozen at a time. Has anybody tryed running Avation fuel (no enthanol) 90 or 100 octane , I've asked at a few shops and nobody can tell me if it will harm anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
497 Posts
The problem with 10% enthanol fuel is it go's BAD much quicker tham non-ethanol fuel. I've had lots of problems with lawn mowers since this entanol thing started. The local Honda shop buys carbs for the new mowers a dozen at a time. Has anybody tryed running Avation fuel (no enthanol) 90 or 100 octane , I've asked at a few shops and nobody can tell me if it will harm anything.
Just run ring saver or some other additive product that helps prevent ethanol damage in it. IT will be much cheaper in the long run.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I run enthanol free fuel in mine and does really good
 

·
Registered
2015 Can Am Commander 800R
Joined
·
40 Posts
Have used regular from day one. No issues at all. Tried a couple of tanks of premium and the only difference i noticed was that it was harder to start. Not sure why but went back to regular and it started better.
You ran into what many small engine manufacturers used to call out. Some has changed since the removal of lead. As pointed out elsewhere the lower the octane the easier it is to detonate. Something you don't want to happen without spark. Because it is easier to detonate, with the initial spark the flame spreads more rapidly, a desirable trait in engines with low or poor compression such as cheap lawn mower or chainsaw engines. Manuals often stated 87 octane only.
 

·
Registered
2015 Can Am Commander 800R
Joined
·
40 Posts
Exactly, the higher the octane number the slower it burns. The lower the octane number the faster it burns. So if you put high octane in the Commander, it would stand to reason it may cause a harder start. This is because the higher octane actually has less energy and burns slower, not giving the pistons the "bang" they need. If the ECU compensated for the value change, you would be fine, but I'm fairly certain it does not.

Raw gasoline has a octane rating of 70 before they add their additives to it. In this form it has the most energy. It would blow most engines apart. Raw ethanol has a octane rating of 113. People think that if race cars use high octane, that must be where the HP is coming from. They use it to keep the heat down and not blow their high compression engines. If you guys throw a turbo on your Commander, no doubt you will want to run high octane. Some guys even run race fuel. believe me, the HP is not coming from the higher octane.
Xelvic, shall I call you the fuel guy? You seem quite knowledgeable, but there could be slight hair splitting. I realize this is old subject but felt I must jump in before reading complete or I might lose my thoughts.
1. Concerning our engine adjusting for octane, a major clue would be if a detonation sensor exists. These have been widely used for at least 20 years because it is so harmful to an engine. When activated it retards the spark. If that happens it could be a case where higher octane could be beneficial. The result would be more power when you step on it. Does a detonation sensor exist?
2. I am certain there are lots of variables in gasoline. And pretty certain the engine was not totally designed to work on specific fuel. Too many variables in the market. Did BRP test all common fuels in the engine before production? Maybe, but I don't think they will release that info. Could certainly start a war with oil company. LOL.
3. Connected to 2. Do some fuels work better with an engine? I must say resoundingly yes. I only tested the fuels that were commonly available to me, all being regular grade. I no longer remember if alcohol was added during those years or they were still using MTBE (outlawed). The test vehicles were three Pontiacs ranging from late 70's, the last being and 86 Parisienne. The first one did not have overdrive. All three had the Oldsmobile 307 CI V8. The first straight carb. The latter had partial throttle body control, mainly idle circuit. Something about that engine loved Chevron regular. I did not pay any attention to relative power but the Chevron would average 2.5 MPG better. I had not found any other engine doing the same. My Lincoln gets Shell Premium exclusively. Not required, but owner's manual states for better power use premium. I ran into no option situations and on a couple of brands it ran noticeably poor. My wife drives a Nissan and had always ran Kroger regular. It was satisfactory.Their premium was one my Lincoln did not like! We moved and Kroger not near. She filled, I drove and ran so poorly I thought she was developing a serious problem. Terrible drop in power. Turned out to be that brand of fuel.
4. For those trying fuels, read the recommendations. Trying stupid stuff might result in stupid problems. Higher octane in general is to allow higher compression. Always trying to acheive a stoichemetric burn, relationship of fuel to oxygen. With the higher compression you up the relationship of oxygen to fuel getting a better burn and higher efficiency (more power from measured quantity of fuel). But these days we have to be mindful of by-products created which adjustments will terribly skew the result.
5. Because of your fuel interests I wish I could point you directly to a documentary I watched a few months ago. I don't remember if title was fuel related, but it was about the secret that won the air war against the Germans. The English and probably some of our planes were not faring very well. Then along came a secret that typically added 20MPH to the planes. The Germans were surprised that the same planes they had been up against were suddenly performing much better and desperately tried to figure it out. Well guarded with select few knowing. Claimed no modification to airplane and less engine maintenance. (Did they at least change timing?) Invented by oil company in Texas (I recognized name as once connected to Bush family). The stated secret was 130 octane fuel.
I feel there must of been a bit more to it having no ideas what was added. That fuel if available might cost $50 a gallon. I do hope you find it and sift through it. Thanks for your helpful efforts.
 

·
Registered
2015 Can Am Commander 800R
Joined
·
40 Posts
Ha Ha, you answered your own question. Higher octane means the fuel has less energy. Adding octane boost means your even further lessening the energy. Like I said, pump gas starts out at 70 octane. They add octane to reduce the energy so it doesn't blow your engine apart.
Less energy? NO! unless they did other stuff to it. Should have same energy unless octane booster decreases and that would make no sense for burning high octane fuels in airplanes where you want to limit weight. Depending upon the engine design it will burn slower and some claim it makes engine last longer. In an engine designed for higher octane, higher compression, the fuel burns more efficiently. More power or better conversion of energy in quantity of fuel. To ascertain for sure would take heavy experimentation and involve micro ingredients affecting wear.
Nearly all of us have at some time seen the selling of water injection systems for cars claiming fantastic mileage. There would be some basis for pushing that theory. It goes back to the B-29 Flying SuperFortress. It did indeed use water injection to gain needed horsepower when loaded to take off. I stress it was only done during take-off because it was detrimental to the engines.
I would not suggest using it unless you plan on frequent engine rebuilds.
 
41 - 60 of 62 Posts
Top