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You guys using regular or Premium ??

Gregg
 

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My dealership filled mine up with regular. I guess I have to break it in with regular and then start using premium.

How far are you guys able to go on a full tank?
 

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In most computer controlled engines the ECU is set to 87 octane unless otherwise stated. Some vehicles require premium fuel and will be indicated in the owners manual. If the vehicle is designed for 87 octane then paying for a higher grade is a waste of money. The higher octane is not a cleaner or better fuel, or will make you engine run better, or give you more HP. It is a simple waste of money.

Most ECU's will not adjust for engine timing based on the octane of the fuel. Example, if you put 91 octane in a engine designed to run 87, the ECU will still recognize it as 87 and won't adjust for the 91. Again, the reason why it's a waste of money. Now on the flip side, if your engine is designed to run on 91 and you put 87 in it, you can have problems like lower HP and pinging. I seriously doubt that the Commander has a ECU will adjust for higher octane rating. Most 50 thousand dollars vehicles can't do that.

The Commander manual says a minimum octane level of 87, which is the recommended octane level, and is the value that is required. Therefore anything higher, and your just giving your money to the oil company. Now when someone cracks the Commander ECU and can change the value from 87 to 91, then and only then will there be a benefit.

Please understand that higher octane does not equal more power. Octane is merely resistance to preignition caused by higher compression or excessive temperature. Reg 87 octane has just as much energy as 91+ in todays computer managed vehicles. Any modern engine gets just as much power from regular as compared to the higher octanes, unless your engine specifically requires it. Higher octane is merely a marketing ploy to play on the ignorant.
 

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In most computer controlled engines the ECU is set to 87 octane unless otherwise stated. Some vehicles require premium fuel and will be indicated in the owners manual. If the vehicle is designed for 87 octane then paying for a higher grade is a waste of money. The higher octane is not a cleaner or better fuel, or will make you engine run better, or give you more HP. It is a simple waste of money. Most ECU's will not adjust for engine timing based on the octane of the fuel. Example, if you put 91 octane in a engine designed to run 87, the ECU will still recognize it as 87 and won't adjust for the 91. Again, the reason why it's a waste of money. Now on the flip side, if your engine is designed to run on 91 and you put 87 in it, you can have problems like lower HP and pinging. I seriously doubt that the Commander has a ECU will adjust for higher octane rating. Most 50 thousand dollars vehicles can't do that. The Commander manual says a minimum octane level of 87, which is the recommended octane level, and is the value that is required. Therefore anything higher, and your just giving your money to the oil company. Now when someone cracks the Commander ECU and can change the value from 87 to 91, then and only then will there be a benefit.

Please understand that higher octane does not equal more power. Octane is merely resistance to preignition caused by higher compression or excessive temperature. Reg 87 octane has just as much energy as 91+ in todays computer managed vehicles. Any modern engine get just as much power from regular as compared to the higher octanes. Higher octane is merely a marketing ploy to play on the ignorant.

Thanks for sharing the knowledge, good to know. I will still by premium just because mentally I cannot put cheap fuel in such an expensive toy. It may be a waste of money, but my dad owned three 76 stations and used to tell me to always buy mid-grade or better.
 

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In most computer controlled engines the ECU is set to 87 octane unless otherwise stated. Some vehicles require premium fuel and will be indicated in the owners manual. If the vehicle is designed for 87 octane then paying for a higher grade is a waste of money. The higher octane is not a cleaner or better fuel, or will make you engine run better, or give you more HP. It is a simple waste of money. Most ECU's will not adjust for engine timing based on the octane of the fuel. Example, if you put 91 octane in a engine designed to run 87, the ECU will still recognize it as 87 and won't adjust for the 91. Again, the reason why it's a waste of money. Now on the flip side, if your engine is designed to run on 91 and you put 87 in it, you can have problems like lower HP and pinging. I seriously doubt that the Commander has a ECU will adjust for higher octane rating. Most 50 thousand dollars vehicles can't do that. The Commander manual says a minimum octane level of 87, which is the recommended octane level, and is the value that is required. Therefore anything higher, and your just giving your money to the oil company. Now when someone cracks the Commander ECU and can change the value from 87 to 91, then and only then will there be a benefit.

Please understand that higher octane does not equal more power. Octane is merely resistance to preignition caused by higher compression or excessive temperature. Reg 87 octane has just as much energy as 91+ in todays computer managed vehicles. Any modern engine gets just as much power from regular as compared to the higher octanes, unless your engine specifically requires it. Higher octane is merely a marketing ploy to play on the ignorant.
I dont care what you say about premium not making more hp or the computers not knowing the difference. my truck gets 3-4 mpg better with it and most low grades now have ethanol and that is a big no-no in the commander it is to dry for the engine.
 

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In most computer controlled engines the ECU is set to 87 octane unless otherwise stated. Some vehicles require premium fuel and will be indicated in the owners manual. If the vehicle is designed for 87 octane then paying for a higher grade is a waste of money. The higher octane is not a cleaner or better fuel, or will make you engine run better, or give you more HP. It is a simple waste of money. Most ECU's will not adjust for engine timing based on the octane of the fuel. Example, if you put 91 octane in a engine designed to run 87, the ECU will still recognize it as 87 and won't adjust for the 91. Again, the reason why it's a waste of money. Now on the flip side, if your engine is designed to run on 91 and you put 87 in it, you can have problems like lower HP and pinging. I seriously doubt that the Commander has a ECU will adjust for higher octane rating. Most 50 thousand dollars vehicles can't do that. The Commander manual says a minimum octane level of 87, which is the recommended octane level, and is the value that is required. Therefore anything higher, and your just giving your money to the oil company. Now when someone cracks the Commander ECU and can change the value from 87 to 91, then and only then will there be a benefit.

Please understand that higher octane does not equal more power. Octane is merely resistance to preignition caused by higher compression or excessive temperature. Reg 87 octane has just as much energy as 91+ in todays computer managed vehicles. Any modern engine gets just as much power from regular as compared to the higher octanes, unless your engine specifically requires it. Higher octane is merely a marketing ploy to play on the ignorant.
I dont care what you say about premium not making more hp or the computers not knowing the difference. my truck gets 3-4 mpg better with it and most low grades now have ethanol and that is a big no-no in the commander it is to dry for the engine.
My point was about the octane rating, not about ethanol. You mean to tell me that 91 with ethanol is better than 87 with ethanol? Ethanol is a whole different equation. Since you brought it up, I guess you know better than the designers at BRP about using ethanol. I wish they would have told me it's a big "NO NO" to use it like you did. Also, the manual says on page 73 ...

Recommended Fuel:

Use regular unleaded gasoline, available from most service stations or oxygenated fuel containing a maximum total of 10% of ethanol or methanol.


Well, I guess when my engine blows up from using ethanol, I can get a warranty fix because they said it was ok. Silly BRP, what were they thinking???

So before you come on here and say "you don't care" what I say. Why don't you read the F'n manual and do some research to make a factual statement. Instead of an opinion based argument, and just saying "my truck gets better gas mileage". So your "theory" must be factual then right? You think I made this $hit up, and then come here and put out bad information. No, this is all well known in the automotive world. So spend your money on 91 octane on a vehicle that's doesn't require it and "believe" it's better for your engine. If your ECU does not adjust for the different octane, it WILL NOT MAKE A BIT OF DIFFERENCE.
 

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Thanks for sharing the knowledge, good to know. I will still by premium just because mentally I cannot put cheap fuel in such an expensive toy. It may be a waste of money, but my dad owned three 76 stations and used to tell me to always buy mid-grade or better.
Don't get me wrong. There are different quality's of fuel. Different brands have different additives that may be better for your engine. I'm strictly talking about the octane rating. If you buy Shell gasoline, and one pump says 87 and the other says 91, there is no difference in the quality of that gasoline, just the octane value. So yes, definitely use good quality fuel, just don't get hung up on the octane rating. It's just like oil. There are many 5w-30's out there spread out over different brands. Is one better than the other, yes, but the weight will still be 5w-30. Lower octane does not mean "cheaper" gas.

The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Knocking can damage an engine, so it is not something you want to have happening. Lower-octane gas (like "regular" 87-octane gasoline) can handle the least amount of compression before igniting.

The compression ratio of your engine determines the octane rating of the gas you must use in the car. One way to increase the HP of an engine of a given displacement is to increase its compression ratio. So a "high-performance engine" has a higher compression ratio and requires higher-octane fuel. The advantage of a high compression ratio is that it gives your engine a higher horsepower rating for a given engine weight -- that is what makes the engine "high performance." The disadvantage is that the gasoline for your engine costs more. In modern ECU controlled vehicles the computer will set the octane value in the computer to not allow any variances because of the engines compression.
 

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Thanks for sharing that information. I honestly didnt know anything about fuel and how it works. I always put in the fuel that was recommended from the owners manual and call it a day.

I for one appreciate the information sharing and even if I disagree with someone I will keep it to myself or start the debate in a politically correct manner.

THanks for sharing
 

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This has got me thinking, does premium have the ethanol added? If it doesn't it would be a no brainer for me. Ethanol has less energy content so in effect you will get worse gas mileage and less power.

Another factor in octane rating is elevation, for example, our lowest elevation in Utah is 4000 feet and therefore our regular gas is only 85 octane.
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This has got me thinking, does premium have the ethanol added? If it doesn't it would be a no brainer for me. Ethanol has less energy content so in effect you will get worse gas mileage and less power.

Another factor in octane rating is elevation, for example, our lowest elevation in Utah is 4000 feet and therefore our regular gas is only 85 octane.
In Nebraska they have to say on the pump if the fuel contains ethanol.
 

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Have used regular from day one. No issues at all. Tried a couple of tanks of premium and the only difference i noticed was that it was harder to start. Not sure why but went back to regular and it started better.
 

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Have used regular from day one. No issues at all. Tried a couple of tanks of premium and the only difference i noticed was that it was harder to start. Not sure why but went back to regular and it started better.
Exactly, the higher the octane number the slower it burns. The lower the octane number the faster it burns. So if you put high octane in the Commander, it would stand to reason it may cause a harder start. This is because the higher octane actually has less energy and burns slower, not giving the pistons the "bang" they need. If the ECU compensated for the value change, you would be fine, but I'm fairly certain it does not.

Raw gasoline has a octane rating of 70 before they add their additives to it. In this form it has the most energy. It would blow most engines apart. Raw ethanol has a octane rating of 113. People think that if race cars use high octane, that must be where the HP is coming from. They use it to keep the heat down and not blow their high compression engines. If you guys throw a turbo on your Commander, no doubt you will want to run high octane. Some guys even run race fuel. believe me, the HP is not coming from the higher octane.
 

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Well put Xelvic. The higher octane fuel will produce less horsepower in a Commander due to the timing and slower burn of the fuel. That is a fact. We used to run premium in 2 stroke engines that didn't require it due to a safety factor on a carbureted engine. If the carb is a bit lean (just a bit) the premium can save you from squeaking it. With our fuel injection systems the engine is always adjusting a limited amount which is all thats needed for a stock engine.

Run 87 a free power mod hint for our Commanders.
 

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Regular since day one!
 
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